How to look forward to rejection letters

This article has been written by Timothy Pike owner of the http://www.dreamplaywrite.com/  blog, as a guest post.

Rejection was the subject of one of my “http://www.dreamplaywrite.com/podcast“recent podcast episodes. The podcast is based on my “http://www.dreamplaywrite.com/commitments” 6 Simple, Daily Commitments That Will Change Your Life (And Fuel Your Writing!), and since one of the Commitments involves knowing yourself, it’s worth examining the feelings produced by being rejected.

First of all, rejection is not really rejection. It’s simply someone telling you, “What you’ve given me is not exactly what I need at this time.”

It has nothing to do with whether it’s good or not. And if the agent does take the time to list some areas that need improvement, that’s even better;that could be your cue to send it in again, after making the suggested changes. 

REjected image

What you have to understand is that the needs of agents and publishers are extremely specific. Agents know their markets well. They know what they can sell, and to whom. So they’re not looking for just anything; no matter how good it is. In certain cases, you may very well have sent the right thing to the wrong agent.

Here’s another way of looking at rejection: it makes you stronger. “http://www.dreamplaywrite.com/bookstore/stephen-king

Stephen King was rejected thirty times for his novel “http://www.dreamplaywrite.com/bookstore/stephen-king/carrie“.

In fact, he got so discouraged, he threw the manuscript in the wastebasket and his wife had to dig it out and encourage him to keep going.

A writer made a comment on “http://www.dreamplaywrite.com/blog

recently, lamenting that he had sent out no fewer than twenty-five query letters to agents about his new book, and didn’t hear back from a single one. He seemed about to give up. Twenty-five! I didn’t want to break the news to him that he had about seventy-five more to go until he had any room at all to complain.

Now you see how rejection can weed out the weak: Stephen King, one of the most famous and successful authors of our time, got more rejections than the total number of query letters, this other person even sent out.

rejection-letter-2

Rejection is an inevitable part of a writer’s life. So take heart, and redouble your efforts. Start a collection; frame rejection letters and hang them on your wall. Make light of it and embrace it. After all, the more you do something you’re afraid of, the less it affects you. Remember, the most successful writers are the ones who took rejection again and again, each time getting up back up and saying, “Thank you, sir, may I have another?”


Ref: “http://www.dreamplaywrite.com“.

Timothy Pike is the host of a “http://www.dreamplaywrite.com/podcast

daily audio program and recently launched the “http://www.dreamplaywrite.com/challenge

12-Month Author Challenge, which challenges writers to write, edit, and self-publish their books in 12 months or less.